Born of the Continent

I was born and brought up on ‘the continent’, Uganda to be more precise. And now settled in the U.K for now.

And the longer I am away from home, the stronger my connection with the Homeland (Africa) grows.

I seem to appreciate the African culture, traditions and ancestral history much more than I ever did. Whether this has to do with being away from home or simply getting older by the years, am not sure. Could be a case for both.

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Christopher OyoComment
Join us on our African Art Journey

At the start of the year when this website went live. I strongly felt that charting the journey of this infant outfit would be a good way of keeping track on what is going on with us, while at the same time giving folks out there the opportunity to learn from our journey. Not a normal way of doing business for sure. But after a lot of toying around with the idea, am firmly back to it. After all it’s my business, and so am going to do it my way.

Here is an extract from our Facebook page, written some time in Feb.

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Christopher Oyo
The Best way to hang your Art work on the Wall.

How many times as a visitor have you had to climb on chairs to have a better look at the hanging on people’s walls?! Same case here, whenever I go visiting, especially in homes of ‘our people’.

It turns out the problem is not my eyes, but rather a mistake on the part of the host hanging those wedding pictures, graduation portraits and art pieces too high up the ceiling. Eye level is where we should keep it.

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Bark Cloth to the fore of Fine Art

Its time the bark cloth took the spotlight in African Art if only for its 15 minutes. This traditional natural fabric comes from the outer bark of a fig tree and pounded into flat plain sheets which are then finished into a variety of home items like clothing, furniture, beddings and Canvvas

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Christopher Oyo
The familiarity of African art

When you have been to an art exhibition, you find that you can easily classify the pieces into the nostalgic that tell the stories of a time before ours and the ones that celebrate life as we know it. Such distinction is near impossible with African art. 

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Katy Carlisle